archiemcphee:

A couple months have passed since we last paid a visit to Department of Awesome Book Art. These beautiful book sculptures were created by UK-based mixed media and collage artist Kerry Miller. Using old, discarded books as her subjects, Miller gives new life to each abandoned volume by painstakingly carving out and arranging the illustrations found within them. Sometimes she also uses inks or watercolors to enhance those illustrations.

“My work is a means of distilling the essence of a book, whilst releasing the images and allowing them to reach a new audience. I view it as a collaboration, a partnership with the past, giving new purpose to old volumes that may otherwise never see the light of day or simply end up in recycling. As technology threatens to replace the printed word, there has never been a better time to reimagine the book.”

Visit Kerry Miller’s website to check out more of her bibliotastic artwork.

[via Twisted Sifter]

archiemcphee:

Today we learned about a species of moth made of cotton candy.

Okay, not really, but these beautiful creatures are still awesome, even if they aren’t made of spun sugar. This is the Rosy Maple Moth (Dryocampa rubicunda), a small North American moth most often found in southern Canada from Ontario to Nova Scotia. They live in deciduous forests and feed mainly on maple trees, but we suspect that some specimens prefer to follow traveling carnivals where they hover over the cotton candy machines.

Photos by Svdmolen, Rhododendrites, Kristi Decourcy, Patrick Spurlock, Ezra S F, MacroscopicSolutions, and Lynette Schimming respectively.

[via Neatorama]

archiemcphee:

The Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders would like to welcome these incredibly tiny, ridiculously cute Caribbean pygmy octopus (Octopus mercatoris) hatchlings, born last month at the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium in Sarasota, Florida.

Can you believe how small they are? Look at all those wee-bitty suckers on their eensy-weensy tentacles. When they’re full grown, these tentacular cuties will only be about the size of a silver dollar. The cuteness, it hurts!

Photos by the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

[via ZooBorns]